As highly regulated, public-sector unionized front-line health-care providers, registered nurses are impacted by an enormous variety of news events, legislative and policy changes.

From outbreaks of infectious diseases to provincial and federal budgets, RNs are affected. ONA’s highly professional, highly educated front-line registered nurses, nurse practitioners, registered practical nurses and allied health professionals are engaged and knowledgeable about all the latest news and policy developments that impact the care they can provide for their patients.

ONA’s Media Room is your one-stop shop to access news, images, and FAQs.

As their union, ONA speaks on behalf of Ontario’s front-line nurses and allied health professionals. Need a front-line health-care perspective on what’s making news? ONA has a professional and responsive media relations staff who can assist you.

Media Relations Officer Sheree Bond is here to help you at 416-964-8833; ext. 2430 or (cell) 416-964-8240; email: shereeb@ona.org.

ONA media releases are available on our website and distributed via Canada Newswire.

Media Room

Read media releases

Charged with the role of patient advocacy, nurses know and are obliged to speak out about the impact of many news developments and policy decisions. Front-line nurses speak out on an array of issues, as found in the below link.

Media Room

ONA in the News

As the voice for Ontario’s front-line registered nurses, ONA is a reliable and knowledgeable source for information. ONA is frequently quoted on policy decisions and other news developments. See the latest ONA news below:

 

February 9: Front-line nurses should be included in proposed federal legislation regarding post-traumatic stress disorder (CBC Radio 1, February 9, 2017). The bill, now facing second reading in the House of Commons, would create a national framework for supporting those coping with PTSD. ONA First Vice-President Vicki McKenna says that every day nurses are dealing with situations that “cause great distress” and can lead to PTSD. Nurses in Ontario were already shut out of provincial PTSD legislation introduced last year.

February 8: Ontario Health Minister Eric Hoskins says he “joins those who are concerned about the sustainability” of the province’s health-care system (Broadcast News, February 8, 2017). ONA has been calling for more health-care funding, noting that more than 1,600 RN positions have been cut in a two-year period. However, Hoskins says that more than 2,000 nurses have been hired in the past three or four years.

February 8: The Kenora Daily Miner & News (February 8, 2017) report on the resignation of the Ontario Medical Association board also reports on the health minister’s response to the call from ONA for increased funding. ONA said that funding needs to be increased as RN positions are cut and attacks on nurses rise. Both Eric Hoskins and Premier Kathleen Wynne told reporters that the federal government needs to increase transfer payments, and that Ontario will continue to increase health-care funding.

February 8: Following a call from the Ontario Nurses’ Association to increase funding “as registered nurse positions are cut from hospitals and attacks on nurses are rising,” the Health Minister says he is concerned about the sustainability of the province’s health-care system (Hamilton Spectator, Canadian Press, February 8, 2017). Both nurses and the Ontario Chamber of Commerce raised concerns about the system. At a health-care announcement, the Premier and Health Minister answered questions on sustainability by discussing the ongoing dispute with the federal government over health transfers. Wynne says that Ontario will continue to increase health-care funding every year, but the federal government needs to “foot more of the bill.”

February 7: ONA is calling for more funding and a minimum of four hours of care per day for residents of long-term care facilities (680 News Toronto, February 7, 2017). ONA says that should include 48 minutes of RN care. First Vice-President Vicki McKenna says that it’s vital that long-term care funding be provided to ensure quality care; inadequate funding is hurting residents and exposing their nurses to increased workplace violence.

February 7: The Ontario Nurses’ Association is calling for more funding and a minimum of four hours of care for residents of long-term care facilities (Canadian Press, February 7, 2017). ONA says that should include 48 minutes of RN care. First Vice-President Vicki McKenna says it’s vital that long-term care funding is adequate for residents to receive that quality of care they deserve. Inadequate funding is hurting residents and leading to nurses to increased workplace violence.

February 1: The Ontario Nurses’ Association and North East CCAC are seeking more contract talks (Northern Daily News, February 1, 2017). The two sides wrapped up two days of negotiations on Friday and plan more bargaining. The approximately 300 ONA members have been working without a contract since March 31, 2016, and ONA First Vice-President Vicki McKenna says they are “striving to be treated in the same way as their counterparts across Ontario.”

February 1: A letter to the editor of the Hamilton Spectator (February 1, 2017) from ONA President Linda Haslam-Stroud says that each week, we see another story about hospital overcrowding and overcapacity. “This is not the way for our patients to receive the care they require,” she writes. Haslam-Stroud believes that Ontario hospitals obviously need more than the 2016 two-per-cent increase they received, if “they have any hope of maintaining current services.” She writes that the government’s decision to flat-line funding for hospitals at zero-per-cent growth in fiscal years 2012 to 2015 “has consequences. This decision directly led to the elimination of more than 1,500 registered nurses’ positions in the last two years. The current funding has not been enough to “slow down the replacement/deletion of RNs; getting your care in hallways from fewer RNs is not the future any of us want,” she writes. Haslam-Stroud urges people to call their MPP to demand at least a three-per-cent increase in hospital funding for 2017, as their care depends on it.

January 29: ONA members working for the North East CCAC are seeking wage parity with their counterparts across Ontario (North Bay Nugget, January 29, 2017). Negotiations between ONA and the CCAC wrapped up after two days of talks, with both sides looking for a third date to meet in the near future. The ONA members gave the association a strike mandate earlier this month should negotiations fail to result in a contract.

January 30: ONA and the NECCAC have wrapped up two days of negotiations and are seeking more contract talks (Sudbury Star, January 30, 2017). ONA issued a release that said the approximately 300 members are “vital to the communities of Sudbury, North Bay, Sault Ste. Marie, Timmins, Parry Sound and Kirkland Lake, including in…Moosonee and Wawa.” ONA First Vice-President Vicki McKenna says that the members are “striving to be treated in the same way as their counterparts across Ontario.”

January 30: The Ontario Nurses’ Association and North East CCAC have wrapped up two days of negotiations and will meet again “in the near future” (Sault Star, January 30, 2017). Approximately 300 ONA members have been working without a contract since last March.

January 26: ONA Local 8’s Sue Sommerdyk says that at Windsor Regional Hospital, patients are “bulging at the seams everywhere” as the hospital continues to experience a prolonged patient surge (Windsor Star, January 26, 2017). She says she has heard of nurses working 16 or 17 days straight to cope with the extra patients, working copious amounts of overtime and giving up their breaks and meals to complete their charting in an attempt to keep up. Sommerdyk says the government is not providing the funds to meet the rising needs of the aging population, and restructuring of local hospitals has left fewer beds and staff to cope when flu season hits. “It’s the reality when you take four hospitals and turn them into one acute-care centre, these people have to go somewhere and we just don’t have the capacity.” The cost to Windsor’s hospital of running overcapacity over the last 53 days is at $1.5 million “and growing,” the report says. CEO David Musyj says he is hoping the Ministry of Health will pick up the tab. NDP MPP Lisa Gretzky says that the very sick patients being admitted now may not be getting the attention they need, and the situation is worsened by the fact the hospital laid off registered nurses last year. “Not only have we lost front-line staff, but those who are there are being run ragged trying to keep up with patient needs,” Gretzky said.

January 23: ONA First Vice-President Vicki McKenna says that at the front line, Windsor Regional Hospital nurses are most concerned about their ability to continue to properly care for their patients as staff are “stretched thin” (CBEW FM, January 23, 2017). Staff has been working overtime daily as the hospital has had 40 more patients than beds on average for three weeks now. McKenna says that, “you have nurses working excessive overtime, trying to cover their bases.”

January 23: A bed shortage is causing concerns for the Ontario Nurses’ Association about staff burnout and quality of patient care at Windsor Regional Hospital (CBC.CA News, January 23, 2017). The hospital is in its third straight week of dealing with the bed shortage, has cancelled several surgeries and is grappling with overcrowding. The Met campus is at 109-per-cent capacity; the Ouellette campus is at 102-per-cent capacity. ONA First Vice-President Vicki McKenna says that staff have been working overtime daily. “At the front line, what the nurses are most worried about is their ability to continue to care for people properly,” she said. “You have nurses working excessive overtime, trying to cover the bases.” McKenna says that “there comes a point when it’s a risk situation, and that’s what they’re most worried about.”

January 19: ONA members working in the North East Community Care Access Centre face fewer resources, are paid less and do not have benefits that are on par with those who do the same type of work in other parts of the province (Sault Star, January 19, 2017). “The North has been treated differently and that’s just not right,” notes ONA First Vice-President Vicki McKenna. The biggest issues include dealing with large workload while operating short-staffed. About 300 ONA members gave ONA a strike mandate should talks fail. Bargaining is scheduled for Jan. 26 and 27. CCAC Senior Director Sandi Campbell says she can’t comment on negotiations that “haven’t really started yet…. We’re certainly optimistic that we can reach a fair settlement so that’s our attitude going in.”

January 17: ONA members at the North East CCAC have given the union a strike mandate if upcoming negotiations fail (Sault Star, January 17, 2017). ONA First Vice-President Vicki McKenna says that the members -including care and placement coordinators, care connectors, wound-care nurses, mental health and addictions nurses and rapid-response nurses- want to be appropriately compensated for the work that they do. “The North has been treated differently, and that’s just not right.

January 16: Nearly 300 ONA members working for the North East CCAC, who have been without a contract since March 2016, will head back to the bargaining table Jan. 26-27 (Northern Daily News, January 16, 2017). The workers are “armed” with the threat of strike action if talks fail. ONA First Vice-President Vicki McKenna says that while members don’t want to withdraw their services, they are united in their desire not to be treated like the “poor cousin in the North” and in their goal to receive a contract comparable to CCAC workers in other parts of Ontario.

January 11: Contract negotiations are continuing for Waterloo Region public health nurses (Waterloo Region Record, January 11, 2017). ONA members working for the health unit held a strike vote ahead of conciliation talks. While the results were not released, a union official said members were supportive of the negotiating committee; the nurses have been working without a contract since June 30, 2016.

January 11: CKGL AM News (January 11, 2017) reports that Region of Waterloo public health nurses are holding a pre-conciliation strike vote as they seek to negotiate a new contract. The 131 ONA members have been working without a contract since last June. ONA Senior Director, Labour Relations, Bev Mathers, says that she is expecting “that our members will strongly support ONA, and their negotiating team, with a strong strike mandate as we head into conciliation at the end of February. The employer has come to the bargaining table asking for a number of concessions and our members are not prepared to accept those concessions when other workers in the region of Waterloo and the cities have not had to make those same concessions and have been offered higher wages.” Mathers notes that nursing is a predominantly female labour force and they “have been offered…a lower wage increase than their male counterparts in other parts of the Region of Waterloo and the cities that form the region.” Mathers detailed the work of public health nurses in keeping the community well, and the reporter praised the services of public health nurses, noting the call from public health nurses she received shortly after giving birth.

January 12: SooToday.com (January 12, 2017) reports that ONA members have voted yes to a strike mandate should they not successfully negotiate a contract with the NE CCAC. ONA First Vice-President Vicki McKenna says that “our dedicated, highly skilled, highly educated nurses and allied health professionals are vital to the communities of Sudbury, North Bay, Sault Ste. Marie, Timmins, Parry Sound and Kirkland Lake…” The approximately 300 members have been without a contract since March 2016. NE CCAC members must not be treated like the “poor cousin in the north,” says ONA, “providing first-class health care and being compensated with second-class wages.”

January 11: Nurses with the North East CCAC are ready to strike to back contract demands (MyEspanolaNow.com, January 11, 2017). ONA did not release any numbers, but did say the negotiating committee has a clear strike mandate from its members. The NE CCAC nurses want a contract similar to what their colleagues have negotiated elsewhere in the province.

January 11: The Ontario Nurses’ Association says NE CCAC nurses have given their negotiating committee a strike mandate (CTV Sudbury, January 11, 2017). This means that if no contract is reached in negotiations, members are willing to hit the picket lines. The ONA members have been without a contract since March 2016.

January 11: Northeastern Ontario CCAC workers who provide community care have voted to strike if contract negotiations later this month fail (Sudbury Star, Kirkland Lake Northern News, January 11, 2017). Vicki McKenna, First Vice-President of the Ontario Nurses’ Association, said in a release that “our dedicated, highly skilled, highly educated nurses and allied health professionals are vital to the communities of Sudbury, North Bay, Sault Ste. Marie, Timmins, Parry Sound and Kirkland Lake” and also work through remote satellite offices in areas such as Moosonee and Wawa. The approximately 300 ONA members have been working without a contract since March 2016. McKenna says that while members do not want to strike, they do want a fair collective agreement, comparable to what other CCAC members doing similar work in other parts of the province receive.

January 9: ONA is calling a code on the health-care system to highlight issues of concern to registered nurses (New Tecumseth Free Press, Glengarry News, Yahoo Canada, National Post, The Province, Windsor Star, January 9, 2017). ONA First Vice-President Vicki McKenna said that “Code Blue signifies our concern that inadequate funding is risking the survival of our publicly funded, publicly provided health-care system. Code White reveals the painful reality of workplace violence against nurses…” She says that ONA is concerned that years of inadequate funding and RN cuts are flat-lining patient care. The RN cuts have also left patients and nurses at risk. “As…RN positions are cut from hospitals, attacks on nurses rise. The vast majority of ONA’s 62,000 members report having experienced physical violence in the workplace.” She urges the public to answer the codes by speaking out at http://nursesknow.ona.org.

January 9: The Ontario Nurses’ Association is “getting loud” about the health-care system concerns of front-line RNs (CIWW Radio Ottawa, January 9, 2017). ONA First Vice-President Vicki McKenna says that the union is calling a Code Blue because “of what’s happening at the front line in many of our hospitals…right across the province.” More and more RN cuts are a serious problem and impact patient care, she says. ONA is calling a Code White because of increasing incidents of violence in health-care settings. “We have reports, well-documented reports and statistics coming in every day, and it’s overwhelming,” she said. Just in the Ottawa area, there was a hospital with 42 violent incidents in 10 months; ONA knows that violence goes largely unreported. McKenna says that the public can help support ONA by visiting our website and signing onto our campaign. She urges that the health-care budget be examined and that elected MPPs realize that health care “has to be at the top of their agenda.” McKenna says that running the health-care system is expensive, “but not running it is more expensive.”

January 10: ONA members working for the North East CCAC have clearly signaled to their negotiating committee a solid strike mandate should negotiation of a new collective agreement not lead to a fair deal (Windsor Star, National Post, Ottawa Citizen, Yahoo Canada, New Tecumseth Online, StarPhoenix, January 10, 2017). ONA First VP Vicki McKenna says the nurses and allied health professionals are vital to their communities and provide excellent front-line care, school health support services and therapy services; they work as care coordinators, placement coordinators, care connectors, wound care nurses, mental health and addictions nurses, rapid response nurses and in Telehomecare. “Our patients’ care needs are paramount to us,” said McKenna. “We are optimistic that a negotiated contract that values our work can be achieved.”

January 10: North East CCAC workers have voted in favour of a strike mandate if they cannot reach a new deal (CBC Thunder Bay, January 10, 2017). The 300 Ontario Nurses’ Association members will be negotiating a new contract January 26 and 27. They have been without a contract since March 31, 2016. ONA says that although members do not want to withdraw services, they will do so if that’s what it takes to reach an agreement. The nurses and allied health professionals provide care in Sudbury, North Bay, Sault Ste. Marie, Timmins, Parry Sound and Kirkland Lake.

January 10: CKAT AM Radio North Bay (January 10, 2017) reports that Ontario Nurses’ Association members working for the North East CCAC have given their negotiating committee a strike mandate. The nearly 300 members work in communities around the region, including North Bay, Sudbury, Timmins and the Sault.

December 30: The Hamilton Spectator’s (December 30, 2016) year in review lists the most-read stories of 2016. Among them was the March announcement of St. Joseph’s Healthcare replacing RNs with RPNs in its neonatal intensive care unit. The hospital announced it would hire 38 new RPNs and cut more than 60 RNs. Ontario Nurses’ Association President Linda Haslam-Stroud said that “our neonates should not be put at risk. They are already vulnerable and are not stable and predictable.”

December 20: Bluewater Health will receive an extra $500,000 in funding and is looking at how to use it to ease ER and surgical wait times (Sarnia Observer, December 20, 2016). However, Mike Lapaine says the cash does not erase years of cutbacks and notes that the hospital is still operating with $5 million less than it did four years ago. Bluewater Health has cut 80 net jobs in recent years to try to balance its budget in the face of a new funding formula and four-year hospital funding freeze. The Ontario Nurses’ Association, Sarnia-Lambton Health Coalition and others have argued that the cuts have negatively impacted patient care.

December 13: ONA has been decrying cuts to RNs at the Brockville Mental Health Centre while the hospital is saying there have been no cuts actually take place (Brockville Recorder & Times, December 13, 2016). ONA President Linda Haslam-Stroud said in a statement that she is “shocked” at the RN cuts and that they will lead to a greater risk of violence for both the remaining nurses and patients. ONA says that Brockville is cutting seven full-time and two part-time RNs in its Forensic Treatment Unit. They are being replaced by RPNs. “Cutting RN positions has been shown in study after study to result in patients suffering more complications,” Haslam-Stroud says. “RN care is vital to these patients, who are unstable and unpredictable and require the care of an RN.” Royal Ottawa Health Care Group, which manages and operates the Brockville site, says there are no layoffs. Staffing changes, says the spokesperson, “will not result in any loss of RNs’ jobs,” and RNs will be offered early retirement packages, voluntary exits, moves to vacant positions, and will simply be reassigned. The news comes as ONA has been calling for increased RN staffing as one of the tools in the battle against workplace violence. ONA says that hospitals have cut more than 1,600 RN positions in the past 23 months. Haslam-Stroud says that “Ontarians have to get loud about the need for more RNs in their hospitals now. We are putting the health and safety of our RNs and our patients at risk.”

November 28: Kirkland Lake has reached a new labour agreement with the Ontario Nurses’ Association (Northern Daily News, November 28, 2016). The town gave the RNs parity with hospital nurses and some improvements to benefits in the new contract. The town employs the nurses at Teck Pioneer Residence.

November 26: The Waterloo Region Record (November 26, 2016) has published a report on the top employers in the region that offer “much more than nice perks.” Among them is Trinity Village, a non-profit business owned by Lutheran Homes Kitchener-Waterloo. The home relies on part-time staff during high-demand times, but it works within the guidelines negotiated in its collective agreement with the Ontario Nurses’ Association and makes every effort to accommodate the scheduling needs of staff. The report notes that what matters most to employees is not the perks and benefits, but a sense that they are listened to and that their observations and opinions matter.

December 2: Brockville Mental Health Centre’s nursing director continued to defend his facility’s safety precautions as the trial against the hospital resumed yesterday (Brockville Recorder & Times, December 2, 2016). Steve Duffy said the site’s existing policies, procedures and facility designs were sufficient to protect nurses from violent patients. The Crown argued that nurses had long been asking for additional security precautions, including surveillance cameras, security guards and hatches on patient room doors to allow staff to provide food and medicine without having to open the door completely. The trial stems from charges laid by the Ministry of Labour in connection with a 2010 incident in which a nurse was repeatedly stabbed in the head and neck by a patient. Duffy acknowledged that since the attack, the facility has made many changes. The hospital has also been ordered to collaborate with ONA and other unions to develop a flagging policy and procedure to identify patients with a risk of workplace violence, the triggers to these behaviors and control measures and procedures to protect workers.

November 25: The Brockville Mental Health Centre (BMHC) continues to defend its “sufficient” safety precautions as the trial against the hospital continues (The Brockville Recorder and Times, November 25, 2016). Under cross-examination by Ministry of Labour lawyers, Steve Duffy, the director of patient care services at the hospital’s forensic unit, claimed that existing policies and procedures were sufficient to protect workers from violent patients. Earlier this year the Ontario Labour Relations Board ordered BMHC to comply with a number of new security measures. Working with unions including the Ontario Nurses’ Association, and the Joint Health and Safety Committee, the hospital must also develop a “flagging policy and procedure to identify patients with a risk of workplace violence, their behaviours, triggers, control measures and procedures to protect workers.”

November 17: The “big takeaway” from ONA’s Biennial Convention is that Ontario’s health-care workers have had enough of violence in the workplace (CFCO AM, November 17, 2016). “It is one of the major topics that’s being discussed,” says ONA’s First Vice-President Vicki McKenna. “It’s about how everyone has certainly a responsibility, but employers have to step up to the plate, and do their job to keep workers safe. And that’s about having the appropriate measures in place.”

November 17: Windsor West MPP Lisa Gretzky says the Ontario Nurses’ Association and several individual doctors have supported her as she fights to have “Dan’s Law” passed (CBC Radio 1 Windsor, November 17, 2016). The private member’s bill would improve access to palliative care for those who move to Ontario from other provinces. She described the bill as an opportunity for Ontario “to be a leader.”

November 17: “Dan’s Law” passed second reading at Queen’s Park on Tuesday (Windsor Star, November 17, 2016). The private member’s bill seeks to eliminate the waiting period for home and community care when someone takes up residence in Ontario after residing in another Canadian province. “There’s a lot of support for this from those on the frontline,” says Windsor-West MPP Lisa Gretzky, who introduced the bill last month. Gretzky says that the Ontario Nurses’ Association and the Ontario Medical Organization are among the groups supporting the bill.

November 17: More than ten years after the murder of Windsor nurse Lori Dupont, ONA is still fighting for the on-the-job safety of health-care workers (Blackburn Radio Windsor, November 17, 2016). ONA’s First Vice-President Vicki McKenna says that ongoing instances of violence in Ontario hospitals are “just deplorable” and that employers need to “step up to the plate” to keep workers safe.

November 17: Strathroy Women Rural Resource Centre is hoping to colour the town purple until December 6 (Strathroy Focus, November 17, 2016). The centre will be selling its “Wrapped in Courage” purple scarves until that day, when it holds its annual vigil commemorating the victims of the 1989 Ecole Polytechnique Massacre. The report says the campaign was started four years ago “by the Ontario Nurses’ Association” and has gained traction across the province. Funds from the sale of the scarves go to support programs and awareness for shelters.

November 8:  A letter to the editor of the Regina Leader-Post (November 8, 2016) from ONA President Linda Haslam-Stroud says that she disagrees with Dr. Charles Shaver’s call for more private health care in Canada. Haslam-Stroud writes that she does agree with Dr. Shaver that Canadians cannot afford to wait years for Dr. Brian Day’s legal challenge of the Canada Health Act to determine the future of our publicly funded, publicly delivered health-care system. Nurses know that adding more for-profit, private health care is not the answer. In fact, doing so in Ontario has not shortened wait times and research has shown that for-profit, private health care institutions provide inferior care at inflated prices. Haslam-Stroud asks why any Canadian would want to see our cost-effective, universal system disappear, when its care is based on need, not the ability to pay. We should all promote a bigger role for public health care.

November 5: A letter to the editor of the Thunder Bay Chronicle-Journal (November 5, 2016) from ONA President Linda Haslam-Stroud says the report on St. Joseph’s Care Group’s funding shortfall needs clarification. ONA is “taken aback” by the number of RN layoffs provided to the Chronicle-Journal by the hospital. Thunder Bay residents should be aware that St. Joseph’s hospital site is cutting 26, not 10, full- and part-time RN, writes Haslam-Stroud, leaving patients with “absolute bare bones RN care.” Haslam-Stroud writes that though hospital executives may be putting a happy face on the ability of remaining staff to care for patients, the “truth is very different. The majority of the cuts are front-line RNs. The same number of managers remain.” She writes that the community should be outraged and urges them to protest the cuts to their MPP or visit nursesknow.ona.org.

November 4: St. Joseph’s Care Group in Thunder Bay has cut a number of RN positions and is preparing to reorganize where patients are located in the facility (Chronicle-Journal, November 4, 2016). CEO Tracy Buckler says the facility is losing $3 million due to the hospital funding formula. Yesterday, VP of rehabilitative care and chronic disease management, Kathleen Lynch, confirmed that 10 full-time RN positions and a number of part-time RN positions are being cut. Local ONA representatives were not available for comment.

November 2: A group of CAMH nurses is breaking the silence after a colleague was brutally beaten a few weeks ago (CityTV, November 2, 2016). One nurse told CityTV that she has just returned to work after being punched in the head and kicked. ONA’s Danielle Latulippe-Larmand says security is in the building but not on every floor. CAMH Chief of Nursing Rani Srivastava says the facility has “phenomenal security people” and staff has access to it as they need it. Having security on every unit, all the time, is not necessarily the right answer,” said Srivastava, though the reporter pointed out that Srivastava is not “the one being punched and kicked and chased after.”

November 2: ONA Local representative Danielle Latulippe-Larmand says that the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health has inadequate safety measures in place, leading to clients who assault nurses (CityTV, November 2, 2016). “These assaults occur often. And it’s not just the physical assault, it’s the verbal assault, it’s the racial slander, it’s the sexual assaults, it’s the touching, the groping, the sexualizing…” Latulippe-Larmand was among a group of nurses united at the corner of CAMH’s Queen West facility to demand an end to violence on the job.

November 2: Coworkers of a nurse who was attacked on the job at the Center for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) will hold an information picket outside the facility on Wednesday (630AM CHED, November 2, 2016). “Our member might have been killed, but for the fact that another staff person witnessed the attack and called for assistance. The RN suffered critical injuries and her sight may be permanently affected. This was yet another very serious event in a long line of workplace violence incidents at CAMH, yet this employer continues to display its laissez-fair attitude to workplace safety and its obligation to protect staff,” says ONA First Vice-President Vicki McKenna. OPSEU President Warren (Smokey) Thomas says the rally will remind the public that health-care workers are there to treat patients “but we can’t do it if we’re not safe in the workplace.”

Behind the Front Lines

Reporters, like registered nurses, have suffered cutbacks and are under pressure to deliver. While they do an admirable job, Behind the Front Lines gives media a glimpse of the story behind the story from front-line RNs’ and allied health professionals’ view.

Read the latest issue:

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Speak to an Expert

The Ontario Nurses’ Association has many experts who are knowledgeable and can discuss a wide range of issues including:

• Patient Safety
• Labour relations
• Occupational health and safety
• Nursing in Ontario
• Health policy and economics
• Infection prevention and control
• Human rights and equity issues
• Political action; and
• Much more.

Simply contact Media Relations Officer Sheree Bond (shereeb@ona.org) for more information, or to arrange an interview with one of our experts.

ONA Fast Facts

62,000 – ONA members
14,000 – Nursing student affiliate members
63 – Number of ONA Locals
500+ – Number of ONA Bargaining Unit Presidents

ONA represents members in the following workplaces:

  • Hospitals.
  • Nursing Homes.
  • Homes for the Aged.
  • Public Health.
  • Community Care Access Centres.
  • Home Care.
  • Clinics.
  • Industry.
  • Family Health Teams.
  • Community Health Centres.

ONA members include:

  • Registered nurses.
  • Nurse practitioners.
  • Registered practical nurses.
  • Occupational therapists.
  • Radiation therapists.
  • Physiotherapists.
  • Social workers.
  • Medical Radiation Technologists.
  • And more.